Location: Scofield Reservoir is located Carbon County Utah. From Spanish Fork take highway 6 about 50 miles, then head west on highway 96 about 10 miles.

Fishing Regulations: Limit 4 trout. No more than two may be Cutthroat or Tiger Trout under 15 inches, and no more than one may be a Cutthroat or Tiger Trout over 22 inches. All Cutthroat and Tiger Trout from 15 to 22 inches must be immediately released. Trout may not be filleted, and the heads or tails may not be removed in the field or in transit. Any trout with cutthroat markings is considered to be a cutthroat trout.

Fish Species: Rainbow Trout, Cutthroat Trout, Chub, Tiger Trout, and Brown Trout. In late 2017 the DWR decided to introduce Wiper, Tiger Muskie and Walleye. It is their hope that this will help the increasing overpopulation of Utah Chubs.

Other Info: The last few Utah state record Tiger Trout have come from here. The current record Tiger Trout weighed in at 19 pounds, 37 1/2″ long, and a girth of 19 5/8″. The reservoir was named after the nearby city of Scofield. Which was named after General Charles W. Scofield.

History: The history of Scofield Reservoir is very controversial and debated often. For well over 100 years the citizens of Sanpete County, and Carbon County have fought over water rights for the region. A story which is told more depth on our Price River page. In 1917 the Mammoth Reservoir dam failed and flooded the nearby cities of Helper and Castle Gate. In 1925 construction was started on Scofield Reservoir to replace Mammoth Reservoir. The construction was finished in 1926. The poorly build dam was struggling. In 1928 the work of a sole beaver nearly caused the dam to fail. Farmers rushed to the scene to fix the leaks. Between 1943 and  1946 a new dam and spillway was constructed.

Nearby Areas to Fish: Lower Gooseberry Reservoir, Kyune Reservoir (private), Smiths Reservoir, Boulger Reservoir, Beaver Dam Reservoir, Fairview Lakes, Huntington Reservoir, Cleveland Reservoir.